MICRONEEDLING

TREATMENT

Microneedling will naturally rejuvenate wrinkles without any painful surgery or injections vs. Microneedling encourages serum topical absorption by 2000%!

The premise is simple – create a small wound and the skin will respond with collagen production and new skin cells. Depending on the depth of the needle penetration, this can offer skin rejuvenation levels from the simple enhancement of product absorption to the clinical treatment of scars and wrinkles.

How Does Microneedling Work?

Microneedling Therapy also called Collagen Induction Therapy (CIT), and Percutaneous (through the skin) Collagen Induction (PCI), is a minimally invasive skin-rejuvenation procedure that involves the use of the MD Needle Pen.

The mechanical action of the pen allows the needles to puncture the skin and create a controlled injury at a specific depth. Each puncture creates a channel that triggers the bodies natural healing process to fill these micro wounds by producing new collagen and elastin in the papillary dermis. In addition, new capillaries are formed for improved blood supply.

With Microneedling, the top layer of the skin is parted without being damaged, leaving the skin intact.  It does not “burn” your skin like peels or more invasive lasers. The needle penetration depth can be adjusted from 0.25mm to 2.50mm into the skin depending on the area of the body and the skin condition being treated. Using skin needling consistently will trigger the bodies repair process until the desired level of skin rejuvenation is achieved.

Microneedling results in the production of new collagen and elastin, improvement in skin tone and texture, firmness as well as reduction in scars, pore size, and stretch marks.

Uses the same type of oscillating motion to treat the skin but the cartridge encompasses 81 silicone tips.

These microscopic hair-like cones separate the cells within the epidermis to allow active products to be pushed into the skin. Nano-Needling only affects the epidermis, treating within the upper .15 mm of the skin. The benefits of this serum infusion treatment include pigmentation reduction, increased cell turnover, skin rejuvenation and an immediate glow with no downtime. This treatment can be done weekly to exfoliate the skin.

Keratinocyte: Makes up 90% of cells in the epidermis and produce the protein keratin. Until recently they were little valued in cosmetic treatments and severely damaged in ablative treatments such as microdermabrasion. Most facial rejuvenation treatments commonly target fibroblasts in the dermis. New movements in science are rethinking this for keratinocytes not only help thicken the epidermis but communicate with the fibroblasts which helps ensure healthy collagen collagen production. Microneedling allows treatments to access the dermis and fibroblasts directly with very little damage to the keratinocytes in the epidermis

Fibroblast: Cells located in the dermis. Were once a “holy grail” in the cosmetic industry, as the production of collagen is a key goal in creating younger looking skin

 

Epidermis: Between: 0.1 -0.15mm thick Statum Basale - 0.15mm deep – stem cells that produce new keratinocytes

Dermis: .5mm deep – Minor trauma causes the fibroblasts to induce collagen as part of the wound healing process

 

Wound Healing In A Nutshell

1. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) promotes the proliferation of fibroblasts – producing collagen and elastin
2. Transforming Growth Factor (TGF-b) actracts fibroblasts which mitigate into the area after injury – Producing collagen
3. Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) promote increase of fibroblasts, epidermal proliferation and new blood vessels.
4. Connective tissue activating peptide III promotes the production of
intercellular matrix
5. During the inflammatory phase, macrophases begin to relace neutrophils
from about 2 days after the injury
6. Macrophages release growth factors PDGF, FGF, TGF-b and TGF-a from day

3-4 – which stimulate fibroblasts
• Some physicians are trying to elongate this last period to stimulate
more fibroblast production
• Best avoided – causes tissue damage

NANO-NEEDLING

  • Both the Nano and microneedling treatments use a pen like device that oscillates a tip up and down to stimulate a skin reaction. They both induce cell turnover, serum infusion and provoke the healing process that results in skin transformation.

  • Nano needling on the other hand works a little different. It does use the same type of oscillating motion to treat the skin but the cartridge encompasses 81 silicone tips. These microscopic hair-like cones separate the cells within the epidermis to allow active products to be pushed into the skin. Nano needling only affects the epidermis, treating within the upper .15 mm of the skin. The benefits of this serum infusion treatment include pigmentation reduction, increased cell turnover, skin rejuvenation and an immediate glow with no downtime. This treatment can be done weekly to exfoliate the skin.

Micro Needling Studies

  • Fabbrocini G, Fardella N, Monfrecola A, Proietti I, Innocenzi D (2009) Acne scarring treatment using skin needling. Clin Exp Dermatol 34: 874-879.

  • Fabbrocini G, Annunziata MC, D’Arco V, De Vita V, Lodi G, Mauriello MC, Pastore F, Monfrecola G (2010) Acne scars: Pathogenesis, classification, and treatment. Dermatol Res Pract 2010: 893080.

  • Fife D (2011) Practical evaluation and management of atrophic acne scars. Tips for the general dermatologist. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol 4: 550-57.

  • Goodman G (2003) Post acne scarring: a review. J Cosmet Laser Ther 5: 77-95.

  • Goodman GJ, Baron JA (2006) Post acne scarring: a qualitative global scarring grading system. Dermatol Surg 32: 1458-1466.

  • Jacob CI, Dover JS, Kaminer MS (2001) Acne scarring: a classification system and review of treatment options. J Am Acad Dermatol 45: 109-117.

  • Leheta TM, Abdel Hay RM, Hegazy RA, El Garem YF (2012) Do combined alternating sessions of 1540 nm nonablative fractional laser and percutaneous collagen induction with trichloroacetic acid 20% show better results than each individual modality in the treatment of atrophic acne scars? A randomized controlled trial. J Dermatolog Treat epub ahead of print.

  • Leheta TM, Abdel Hay RM, El Garem YF (2012) Deep peeling using phenol versus percutaneous collagen induction combined with trichloroacetic acid20 in atrophic post-acne scars: a randomized controlled trial. J Dermatology Treat epub ahead of print.

  • Leheta T, El Tawdy A, Abdel Hay R, Farid S (2011) Percutaneous collagen induction versus full-concentration trichloroacetic acid in thetreatmentofatrophicacnescars. DermatolSurg37:207-216.

  • Levy LL, Zeichner JA (2012) Management of acne scarring, Part II: A comparative review of non-laser based, minimally invasive approaches. Am J Clin Dermatol 13:331-340.

  • Shah SK, Alexis AF (2010) Acne in skin of color: practical approaches to treatment. J Dermatolog Treat 21:206-2

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